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What’s in my backyard?: Identifying local biodiversity

August 11, 2015 • Posted in: News, Pench Maharashtra Workshops, Workshops

With a clear understanding of what biodiversity is and the importance of it, it was time to explore the biodiversity in their very backyards. Each forest has its own composition of species that play different roles in the ecosystem. Thus every ecosystem is unique and this was the message we wished to share with our students. IT was now time to discover the wonders of the forest of Pench.

The students ready to watch videos on the forests.

The students ready to watch videos on the forests.

Beginning with a video on the Pench Tiger Reserve and a second, on tropical forests, the students were encouraged to observe the animals and plants in both the videos. The students made a note of the differences between both the forests. They then brainstormed on the possible reasons for a difference in the biodiversity of a tropical forest and their very own forest of Pench.

The students were now ready to head out into the field. Six different locations were chosen for the students to explore and make note of the biodiversity observed there. The students were then sent out with some expert local guides of Pench to explore the sites. They were to note at least 2 different birds, 2 plants and 2 mammals. Some of the students went towards the lake, some towards the forest and some around the village.

Students on their way to their chosen sites to observe the biodiversity.

Students on their way to their chosen sites to observe the biodiversity.

On their return to class, they compared their notes and observed species list. On their return to class, the students compared their notes and shared their observations.

Students compare their observations on their return to class.

Students compare their observations on their return to class.

Often, when surrounded by such beauty we become immune to it. Activities like these help us bring back the awe of nature.

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